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Tuesday, June 06, 2006

Holy Friggin' Typo!

You probably need to click on the image and look at the large version to see this:

"One of Roth's most powerful novel's ever..."

Ouch!

11 comments:

Anonymous said...

I love Lynn Truss's author photo at the back of "Eats, Shoots, and Leaves".

She's seen with marker in hand, applying an apostrophe to a movie poster of "Two Weeks (sic) Notice".

Anonymous said...

Holy carp, it IS contagious.

we've got a market that we take to the grocery to vandalize incorrect grammar.....

Anonymous said...

A few weeks after hearing Thomas Lux read his poem "I Love You Sweatheart," I found "Sweatheart" paper plates in my grocery store.

Anonymous said...

Was it the book jacket designer's mistake (HORRIBLE) or was he/she merely quoting faithfully from the New York Times? (EVEN MORE HORRIBLE).

At least the author's name was spelled correctly. I have a friend whose name was misspelled on her (Harlequin) cover.

amandarama said...

This is one of the most horrifying things I've seen in recent days - and yet, I love it!

Joseph said...

Here's what the NYTimes has:

The resulting book is one of Mr. Roth's most powerful novels ever, a big, rough-hewn work built on a grand design, a book that is as moving, generous and ambitious as his last novel, ''Sabbath's Theater,'' was sour, solipsistic and narrow.

Kristen King said...

Holy copyediting, Batman! It's like a car accident on the side of the highway--I can't stop looking at it. Except with this, I'm grinning. Car accidents are nothing to grin about.

Anonymous said...

Why does everyone always blame the designer? Writers write. Editors edit. Designers design. Proofreaders proofread.

Thanks to Joseph for the NYTimes quote. That's way funnier than the typo!

Katharine said...

Yes, Anon #5, but at the publishing houses where I've worked, cover proofs are rarely shown to copyeditors, pretty much all of whom are freelancers like me, rather than staff members, these days.

Leslea said...

I catch stuff like this all the time, yet I can't get anyone to take me up on my proofreadin' skillz!

It doesn't bother me in informal conversation or email or whatever, but when you are selling words, frequent typos are a rip-off.

Anonymous said...

A misquote that makes her look like an idiot: Michie should sue.