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Monday, July 03, 2006

Cross Country

I guess that a book with a subtitle this long needs an equally chaotic jacket.

8 comments:

Martin said...

Dear me, this one violates about every typographic rule I have ever heard of.

E is for Editrix said...

When I read the review I was wondering how they'd handle that sub-title...I guess this answers my question. It hurts my eyes though...

Eileen said...

I would run screaming from this cover.

Brian said...

Really? I think this is a very very great cover. It gives off a very aimless, wandering vibe. No, it's not very attractive, but I'm sure the story itself is far from neat and tidy.

Eileen said...

I might LOVE the book- but it might be one of those books where I handily craft my own jacket from a brown paper bag. The book itself sounds very fun. The cover not so much.

Joseph said...

I have to say that this is growing on me. If you think of the chaos as all the hand-lettered signs you would see on the sides of roads, barns, in front of little shops, etc., it makes a kind of sense.

amandarama said...

That's a hell of a subtitle. The cover does not make me want to read the book - but the book does.

essrog said...

The design does seem like an apt reflection of the scattered-sounding title / subtitle,

and it's suggestive of that Beat Generation "cut-up" technique pioneered by Brion Gysin.

The connection here is

- Jack Kerouac, who did a famous "Cross Country" of his own ("On the Road"),

- who was a key figure among the Beats and a contemporary of Brion Gysin,

- who made the cut-up technique a graphic counterpart to the literary experimentalism of the Beats

- which is demonstrated in this design ... for better or worse

Yes, I'll concede it's a bit of a stretch. And having said all this, I think a cut-up design is defensible for this cover, but the execution could have been better